February 27, 2003

This 1904 photograph of a group of nuns in Tibet's Tatsang nunnery was taken by Claude White. It's just one of a group of stunning photographs that make up an excellent Flash presentation of photographs from the archives of the Royal Geographical Society. Take a break and travel around the world (and through time!) in 8 minutes. (There is an amazing after-story to this photograph which you can read about in this article on the RGS's wonderful picture librarian Joanna Wright. Ms. Wright was so taken by this photograph, and the bizarre hairstyles of the nuns, that she travelled to Dharamsala to discover the story behind the photograph. You could at least click the link.)

February 26, 2003

This photo of Hawaii's 1939 Pineapple Princess is just one of a number of unusual pineapple images in Grettir Asmundarson's beautiful and informative pineapple gallery. Asmundarson, who runs the tiny pineapple weblog, also has an enormous collection of cover art from nurse books. Our favorite was Aerospace Nurse.
(link via newthings which just keeps getting better and better every day. newthings has got itself a new domain name so make sure to change your bookmarks and blogrolls.)

February 24, 2003

Gigantic sea-creatures roam the lightningfield. This frightening fellow is just one of many great NYC photos by David Gallagher to be found at his excellent photoblog - lightningfield.

Vespa Calender Girls!
(link via geegaw who should totally get a scooter despite her list of
10 Reasons Not To Buy a Vespa Scooter. Geegaw also has some more cool links to scootergirl sites, although, strangely, she did not have the wonderfully understated, subtle, and classyScooter Babes)

February 23, 2003

I promised I'd be back by the weekend so, well, here I am. Unfortunately all I have for you to look at is another damn picture of my dog Jack. Perhaps I should just change this weblog's name from Portage to Dogblog or Jack's World or something like that. More importantly, I had to shovel snow all morning and, as usual, Jack just goofed off and played in the snow.

February 18, 2003

Portage will return on the weekend.

February 06, 2003

We're long time fans of Steve King's excellent Today in Literature site but we just wanted to make a special note of yesterday's fascinating post on a meeting in 1959 between Isak Dinesen and Marilyn Monroe. Great stuff. (Note: You can see a photograph of the luncheon here.

February 05, 2003

The photograph above, The Palace of the Leprous King, was taken in 1865 by John Thomson whom we mentioned yesterday. Thomson was the first perosn ever to photograph the legendary city of Angkor which was discovered that year deep in the Cambodian jungle. The National Library of Scotland has a very nice online exhibition called The Photographs of John Thomson

February 04, 2003

photoLondon is an excellent new site that brings together some of the best photographs of London from the collections of the Museum of London, the Guildhall Library, the Metropolitan Archives, the Westminster Archives, and the National Monuments Record. The site is not meant to be an online archive but rather to give a taste of what is avaliable at each member organizations. It's excellent. We think that the idea of a central portal that gives access to the collections of organizations with similar missions is one that should be implemented more.

There's some great photos at photoLondon and each one comes accompanied by a sizable blurb about the photo, the photographer, and it's place in the history of photography. One of our favorites was this John Thomson photograph entitledThe Crawlers. It comes from a larger collection of photographs and commentary that Thomson completed in 1878 called Street Life in London which is considered to be the first collection of social documentary photographs ever published. Less depressing is this 1904 photo (above) of an "Open-Air School of Recovery" for "delicate children".


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